st. martin's press 2013


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Aug 21, 2014
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This? Is why I think it’s vital that we fight for diverse literature in schools. When the book-banning folks come out, it’s so often to shut down a person belonging to a minority group speaking about experiences that make people uncomfortable. Of course we are uncomfortable. We are complicit. It takes discomfort to impel change.

Not all kids will get a real picture of the world at home; I certainly didn’t. Those kids may go on to be the next generation of oppressors, having been taught lies that cause them to see minorities as subhuman, unless they have outside influences to show them otherwise. It matters that they read books by African-Americans, by women, by LGBT authors. It matters that they gain empathy and experience others’ lives.

It matters that they become uncomfortable enough to change.

— from Reading Helped Me Overcome My Racist Upbringing by Susie Rodarme (via bookriot)

(via booklover)


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 4:00 am
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128 notes

If you and your friend(s) are in the same field and you can collaborate or help each other, do this, without shame. It’s not your fault your friends are awesome. Men invented nepotism and practically live by it. It’s okay for women to do it too.

— Roxane Gay, “How to Be Friends With Another Woman” (via catagator)


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:59 am
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9,036 notes

Anonymous said: I really want to do something about Ferguson but I live states away and have no money to fund anything. Do you know of any petitions or SOMETHING I can do, because I've tried my hardest to get the word out, we new to reach out to these people. I feel like we aren't doing enough there has to be something.

yungfeminist:

Okay there’s a lot of different posts with multiple links each on how to help and some of them overlap so I’m just gonna compile all the relevant links I can think of here:

Contact the Ferguson Police Department and seek information on those being detained, the protests, legal procedures, etc.

Ferguson Police Department
Email (taken off the site)
222 S. Florissant Road Ferguson, MO 63135
Ph: 314-522-3100 Fx: 314-524-5290

  • DO NOT reblog photos of Mike Brown’s body lying on the street. His family has requested that these photos not be spread around. Please respect their wishes.

Very importantly, stay alert. Read everything you can on the subject. The reports on The New York Times, Al Jazeera, and other news outlets are very limited, especially because the police in Ferguson are going to great lengths to keep reporters out. Seek out what you can online and from first hand sources, if you know anyone in the area. Listen to the stories of those who have been affected by this tragedy and other similar ones. Educate yourself as much as you possibly can so you can help make sure the right people are heard.


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:58 am
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teenlibrariantoolbox:

Sexual Violence Resource List
As part of the #SVYALit Project, we have spent a lot of time compiling statistics and looking for resources to help us talk with teens, parents, educators and librarians about the issues.  Today we are compiling some of the best resources we have found to help create a well rounded picture of the issues at hand and how various members of the community are trying to help make a difference in this very important issue. Here are several resources you can consult to get a more complete picture of what sexual violence is, how often it happens, and how we can talk with teens about making healthy sexual choices.RAINN RAINN is the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. This is the go to resource for information on sexual violence and they operate a 24 hour helpline that you can refer victims/survivors to for help and support.ScarletTeen ScarletTeen is a website dedicated to providing real and accurate sex education to teens. They cover a wide variety of topics, including menstruation and pregnancy. This is not just a resource on sexual violence, it is a resource for comprehensive sex and health education. But they also have discussion on things like how guys can prevent rape, what sexual violence is, and navigating consent.The Good Men Project In particular, The Good Men Project has a good discussion about teaching consent at various ages as a child grows. This isn’t a conversation you should wait to have when your kids are teens, because you begin laying the foundation early on as you teach your child they can’t take things that don’t belong to them, they have to wait their turn, etc. Stop Street Harassment Street Harassment covers things like catcalling, whistling, and other forms of harassment that mostly women and members of the GLBTQ community experience as they walk down the streets. I would argue that it also includes the same types of harassment that our teens experience in the hallways of their middle and high schools, because those are the streets are teens are walking. I get email often from - again, mostly girls - who share the horrific stories of the verbal abuse and unwanted touching they experience on the way to and from school or in the school hallways. SSH has some great resources to understand what street harassment is and to engage in discussions on how to try and change the culture so that everyone can walk through their daily routine safely. Another great initiative that is addressing the issue of street harassment is HollaBack. Act for Youth: Sexual Health This resource has a look at what healthy sexuality is. It includes the WHO definition of sexual health which is defined as “a state of physical, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality. It requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.” This resource is important because it helps us all set up the goal posts. In our sex education with teens, this is what we are (should be) striving for.The Teen Files Flipped: Date Rape/Abusive Relationship This fully developed curriculum helps teens define date rape and looks at some of the identifying traits of an abusive relationship. It contains discussion questions, curriculum connections and more. It is part of the AIMS series, published in 2002. The CDC also has a Rape Prevention and Education resource and curriculum that you may want to look at.The Consensual Project: Connecting Through Consent According the The Consensual Project’s website, the project partners with schools to help teens gain a deep understanding of what consent is. The consent workshops were developed by Ben, who majored in Women and Gender studies. It seems fairly new, so do take a look around and investigate. Also, it has a great resource page.Sexual Harassment: Prevention in the Schools, a facilitators manual and curriculum for grades 1 through 12  The Pennsyvania Coalition Against Rape has developed an extensive curriculum to help teach students in grades K-12 about sexual harassment. At 261 pages, it is pretty extensive and well developed. You can download it for free in PDF by clicking the link above.Know the Price: Rape by Intoxication Know the Price is a campaign recently introduced in San Diego which aims to help teens understand that having sex with someone who is intoxicated is in fact rape. Its underlying message is that a person must be cognitively able to consent in order for it to be consensual sex. This means that you can not have sex with someone who is wasted, unconscious, asleep, etc. The Voices and Faces Project According to its website: “The Voices and Faces Project is an award-winning documentary initiative created to bring the names, faces and stories of survivors of sexual violence and trafficking to the attention of the public.” By compiling the various stories of survivors in a permanent archive, The Voices and Faces Project seeks to help everyone better understand the issues surrounding sexual violence and the impact it makes on survivors, their families and their communities. Project Unbreakable Project Unbreakable is a Tumblr blog that operates primarily on anonymous submissions from sexual violence victims/survivors. The submissions are pictures of survivors sharing with us what their abuser said to them before, during or after their attack. They are definitely hard to read but such an important part of raising awareness and understanding of the dynamics that take place. There are quite a few Tumblr blogs dedicated to the topic including I Believe You, It’s Not Your Fault, which was recently discussed on NPR’s The Takeaway. Both of these Tumblr projects are run by survivors and encourage the named or anonymous submissions of other survivor stories.
http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/08/10-svyalit-project-resources.html

teenlibrariantoolbox:

Sexual Violence Resource List

As part of the #SVYALit Project, we have spent a lot of time compiling statistics and looking for resources to help us talk with teens, parents, educators and librarians about the issues.  Today we are compiling some of the best resources we have found to help create a well rounded picture of the issues at hand and how various members of the community are trying to help make a difference in this very important issue. Here are several resources you can consult to get a more complete picture of what sexual violence is, how often it happens, and how we can talk with teens about making healthy sexual choices.

RAINN

RAINN is the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. This is the go to resource for information on sexual violence and they operate a 24 hour helpline that you can refer victims/survivors to for help and support.

ScarletTeen

ScarletTeen is a website dedicated to providing real and accurate sex education to teens. They cover a wide variety of topics, including menstruation and pregnancy. This is not just a resource on sexual violence, it is a resource for comprehensive sex and health education. But they also have discussion on things like how guys can prevent rape, what sexual violence is, and navigating consent.

The Good Men Project

In particular, The Good Men Project has a good discussion about teaching consent at various ages as a child grows. This isn’t a conversation you should wait to have when your kids are teens, because you begin laying the foundation early on as you teach your child they can’t take things that don’t belong to them, they have to wait their turn, etc.

Stop Street Harassment

Street Harassment covers things like catcalling, whistling, and other forms of harassment that mostly women and members of the GLBTQ community experience as they walk down the streets. I would argue that it also includes the same types of harassment that our teens experience in the hallways of their middle and high schools, because those are the streets are teens are walking. I get email often from - again, mostly girls - who share the horrific stories of the verbal abuse and unwanted touching they experience on the way to and from school or in the school hallways. SSH has some great resources to understand what street harassment is and to engage in discussions on how to try and change the culture so that everyone can walk through their daily routine safely. Another great initiative that is addressing the issue of street harassment is HollaBack.

Act for Youth: Sexual Health

This resource has a look at what healthy sexuality is. It includes the WHO definition of sexual health which is defined as “a state of physical, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality. It requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.” This resource is important because it helps us all set up the goal posts. In our sex education with teens, this is what we are (should be) striving for.

The Teen Files Flipped: Date Rape/Abusive Relationship

This fully developed curriculum helps teens define date rape and looks at some of the identifying traits of an abusive relationship. It contains discussion questions, curriculum connections and more. It is part of the AIMS series, published in 2002. The CDC also has a Rape Prevention and Education resource and curriculum that you may want to look at.

The Consensual Project: Connecting Through Consent

According the The Consensual Project’s website, the project partners with schools to help teens gain a deep understanding of what consent is. The consent workshops were developed by Ben, who majored in Women and Gender studies. It seems fairly new, so do take a look around and investigate. Also, it has a great resource page.

Sexual Harassment: Prevention in the Schools, a facilitators manual and curriculum for grades 1 through 12 

The Pennsyvania Coalition Against Rape has developed an extensive curriculum to help teach students in grades K-12 about sexual harassment. At 261 pages, it is pretty extensive and well developed. You can download it for free in PDF by clicking the link above.

Know the Price: Rape by Intoxication

Know the Price is a campaign recently introduced in San Diego which aims to help teens understand that having sex with someone who is intoxicated is in fact rape. Its underlying message is that a person must be cognitively able to consent in order for it to be consensual sex. This means that you can not have sex with someone who is wasted, unconscious, asleep, etc.

The Voices and Faces Project

According to its website: “The Voices and Faces Project is an award-winning documentary initiative created to bring the names, faces and stories of survivors of sexual violence and trafficking to the attention of the public.” By compiling the various stories of survivors in a permanent archive, The Voices and Faces Project seeks to help everyone better understand the issues surrounding sexual violence and the impact it makes on survivors, their families and their communities.

Project Unbreakable

Project Unbreakable is a Tumblr blog that operates primarily on anonymous submissions from sexual violence victims/survivors. The submissions are pictures of survivors sharing with us what their abuser said to them before, during or after their attack. They are definitely hard to read but such an important part of raising awareness and understanding of the dynamics that take place. There are quite a few Tumblr blogs dedicated to the topic including I Believe You, It’s Not Your Fault, which was recently discussed on NPR’s The Takeaway. Both of these Tumblr projects are run by survivors and encourage the named or anonymous submissions of other survivor stories.

http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/08/10-svyalit-project-resources.html

(via heatherlreid)


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:57 am
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152 notes

Ferguson is an occupation in plain sight and words aren't enough to change that »

grillans:

"I am stunned but I should not be. I recognize the luxury of my disbelief. I will never allow myself such luxury again. Today, I truly understand privilege.

I am outraged but I do not know what to do with my outrage that might be productive, that might move this world forward toward a place where black lives matter, and where black parents no longer need to have “the talk” with their children about how not to be killed by police and where anger over a lifetime of wrongs is not judged, but understood and supported.

The mainstream media is trying to report on this travesty, and all too often, they are failing. There is a preoccupation with the actions of a few, with the salacious discussions of looting and a people run amok over the plight of the many living in an occupied community.”

(via roxanegay)


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:56 am
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184 notes

rookiemag:

August 13, 2014

High hopes and racing hearts.
Visual diary above by Caitlin H. Plus written entries from:
Britney
I want a blunt and interesting presence. Read More »
Marah
Life in Damascus and life in Ghouta, my hometown, are as different as heaven and hell. Read More »
Lilly
Tomorrow night, I’ll lace up my cleats and step onto the field for the first time. Read More »
Ananda

The outside world just feels like too much to handle sometimes. Read More »

rookiemag:

August 13, 2014

High hopes and racing hearts.

Visual diary above by Caitlin H. Plus written entries from:

Britney

I want a blunt and interesting presence. Read More »

Marah

Life in Damascus and life in Ghouta, my hometown, are as different as heaven and hell. Read More »

Lilly

Tomorrow night, I’ll lace up my cleats and step onto the field for the first time. Read More »

Ananda

The outside world just feels like too much to handle sometimes. Read More »


Text

Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:55 am
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683 notes

metaphorformetaphor:

I’m working on my own life story. I don’t mean I’m putting it together; no, I’m taking it apart.

— Margaret Atwood, The Tent (Anchor, 2007)

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via englishmajorinrepair)


Text

Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:54 am
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21 notes

Anonymous said: have you ever stolen a book?

englishmajorinrepair:

When I was in sixth grade, I stole The House on Mango Street from my school’s library. I don’t even know why exactly — besides the fact that I just really loved that book…? I found it in my room a few years ago with my middle school sticker still on it. Good job, sixth grade self. Really great job. 


Text

Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:52 am
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35 notes

Anonymous said: Is uni really necessary for writers?

violentwavesofemotion:

No, but a soul/brain combination is


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Aug 15, 2014
@ 3:51 am
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744 notes

Fundraising for new anthology on autism and race by autistic people of color »

andreashettle:

namelessthingsdismantle:

I’m editing this awesome new project in partnership with the Autism Women’s Network, and I hope folks will consider donating if they can to help make this a reality. 

Stay tuned in the next few days, because we’ll be releasing the formal call for submissions then! Until the official thing goes out, questions can be emailed to lydia@autistichoya.com. Thanks everyone!

Leaving Evidence

I am a proud autistic of color working with the Autism Women’s Network to create the first ever anthology of writings by autistics of color about our lives, our experiences, our histories, our communities, our struggles, our passions, and our resilience. Our stories deserve to be told both for us and for future generations that will come after us. They are stories of segregation in education, police brutality, families of birth, adoption, and choosing, ableism connected to racism, finding community, making home, survival, and resilience.  They are stories of being autistic in a neurotypical world and stories of being racialized in a white-dominant world. 

Disabled, queer, and racialized activist Mia Mingus urges us to leave evidence that we existed so that our stories and our lives will not be erased or forgotten. The Autism Women’s Network is committed to supporting projects that connect disability rights to other struggles and movements. This anthology will help us explore new ground for autistic communities of color whose stories need to be told. 

As an autistic person of color, it’s not uncommon for me to go to autistic community events and find myself to be the only non-white person there or sometimes one of only a few. Yet it is impossible to separate my experiences as autistic from my experiences as a transracial East Asian adoptee. Here’s the important part — I’m not the only one. We are everywhere. Indigenous and native, mixed-race and multiracial, Black, Brown, South Asian, East Asian, of color, racialized — and autistic. Our lives and our stories matter. 

We invite you to support us in amplifying our voices. 

What We Need

We are raising money to cover the costs of printing and publication, which include print and alternate formats, ISBNs so we can place copies in libraries, and small stipends for the project leads. 

Additional funds raised will go toward increasing availability of alternative formats, including online access. Any further additional funds will go to the Autism Women’s Network to support other projects empowering autistic women.  

Risks & Challenges

Because we are soliciting contributions from people who may have multiple disabilities, chronic pain or other illnesses, and language and communication impairments, it is possible we will fall behind schedule. We aim to finish publishing the anthology in 2015, but may need to be flexible about deadlines. 

Who We Are

My name is Lydia Brown (though you might know me better as Autistic Hoya). I’m an activist and writer focusing on violence against multiply-marginalized disabled people, including hate crimes, policy brutality, and prisoner abuse. At present, I am serving on the board of the Autism Women’s Network. I am also president and co-founder of the Washington Metro Disabled Students Collective. I have worked with the Autistic Self Advocacy Network’s national office, and am a past Patricia Morrissey Disability Policy Fellow at the Institute for Educational Leadership. In 2013, I was honored by the White House as a Champion of Change for disability rights. 

The mission of the Autism Women’s Network (AWN) is to provide effective supports to Autistic women and girls of all ages through a sense of community, advocacy and resources. AWN is committed to recognizing and celebrating diversity and the many intersectional experiences of Autistic women.  AWN welcomes all women, supporters of women, those who have at one time identified as women and non binary gender variant individuals.  AWN recognizes and affirms the gender identity of each individual.  AWN also welcomes the support and community of those who do not and have not identified as women as allies to support us in our work.

Other Ways You Can Help

You may not be able to donate money, but that doesn’t mean you can’t help:

  • Ask folks to get the word out and share our fundraiser on social media and in your network! (Indiegogo has some nifty buttons that let you do that.)
  • Consider submitting your own writing or suggesting autistic people of color who may be interested in submitting! 

Thank you so much for your support. Onward!

Signal boosting again

(via disabilityinkidlit)